Working at Height – What is meant by Working at Height?

Working at height is defined by HSE as any work in any place where, if precautions are not taken, a person could fall a distance liable to cause personal injury.

Due to the increasing height and number of tall buildings, it is becoming ever more relevant to understand the details of working at height.


Particular steps can be taken to make the activity safer, and indeed legislation that stipulates what must happen when organising work at height.

This article briefly outlines the details of the legislation involved, some basic principles to be considered when planning work at heights, and the appropriate details on who can work at height.

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Allergens – What are the 14 main allergens?

Allergies can be life-threatening. Most people are aware of potential reactions to peanuts, but for a long time, the public was generally unaware of allergens within other foods.

In July 2016, a teenager suffered a fatal reaction to sesame in a baguette bought at a national chain. 

In the Uk, the Food Information Regulations act was introduced to ensure that the correct labelling of ingredients in Pre-Packaged foods included all 14 main allergens.

Unfortunately, freshly handmade, non pre-packaged food does not have to be individually labelled.

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Safety Management Programme – Essential Elements

It is important to understand the elements of a good process safety management programme to protect employees from harm when they are in their work environment.

Implementing such a programme is impossible without cooperation from every level of the company, managers and non-managers alike.

In this article we look at the core elements of a successful safety management programme:

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Healthcare assistant – what does an HCA do?

Deciding to become a healthcare assistant opens up a number of options for a career in care. Healthcare assistants (often referred to as care assistants, support workers or HCA) play a vital role in the National Health Service (NHS). They also work in patients homes or community settings such as GP surgeries.

This article offers some insight into healthcare assistants (HCAs) work and discusses possible options for training at entry level and beyond. It also looks at required skill sets for those wishing to undertake a role in the area of general patient care.

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What is Reablement?

Reablement is an intensive short service, usually delivered in the home (or care home), which is offered to those recovering from an illness or injury. Whether it be after surgery or a bout of serious illness, modern medicine is often able to cure their afflictions.

However, for many people, the process of healing doesn’t end at discharge from the hospital. Aftercare of various lengths is typically required for many patients, with varying degrees of intensity.

This article will explain the process of reablement, and what things might take place during the course of aftercare treatment.

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Portable Appliance Testing – What to expect on a PAT course?

Portable appliance testing is the term used to describe the testing of electrical appliances to ensure they are safe to use. It is often referred to as the acronym PAT. Its purpose is to prevent electrical accidents in the work and home environment. A full PAT test should include both a visual assessment and a more in-depth inspection using specialist PAT testing equipment.

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Treating Depression

Depression is a serious mental health condition that affects many thousands of people globally. In the UK alone 3% of people suffer from some form of clinical depression, with numbers rising as high as 20% for more general thoughts of suicidality. As such, understanding proper treatment options for depression is an important element of patient care. This article highlights the primary paths available when treating depression.

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OCD – What is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder?

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (also known as OCD) is a type of mental health condition that approximately 1.2% of Britons suffer from. It is a term often used colloquially to mean someone who is very fussy about things being a certain way, or an alternate term for a perfectionist, but in reality it is a serious condition that can have a very large impact on a person’s life.

This article will explain what Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is, outline its symptoms, and provide information on the treatment of the condition.

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ADHD – What is Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder?

Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (better known as ADHD) is a behavioural condition that is being seen more frequently in media and headlines. Some one-and-a-half million people with the condition live in the UK, but a distinct minority have an official diagnosis. Despite this, ADHD is a condition about which many misconceptions exist. This article will give an overview of what ADHD is, its symptoms, and some basic information about how the condition is diagnosed and treated.

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Mental health illness – how common is it?

According to statistics from NHS Digital, at any one time, a sixth of the population in England aged 16 to 64 have a mental health illness.  Whether family, friends, neighbours or work colleagues, the chances are we all know someone that is affected.

The figures, while worrying, in reality don’t even scratch the surface.  The study, which leaves out less common conditions – and is a snapshot in time, could be closer to a quarter of the population experiencing mental health illness on an annual basis.

Statistically, women are more likely than men to experience mental and emotional (not psychotic) illness. Research shows that 20 per cent of all adult women between the ages of 16 to 65 have ‘significant mental health problems’, as compared with 14 per cent of men between these ages.
However, women are more likely to seek, and be diagnosed, help for mental health problems.

Young people are particularly susceptible to mental health difficulties.

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