Protective Work Clothing

Protective Work Clothing is the attire that is worn in place of regular clothing or over regular clothing to protect an individual or their clothing from damage or abnormal soiling or to maintain a high sanitary environment. This clothing includes items ranging from serving aprons, surgical gowns, farm coats, laboratory coats, shop coats and other dresses. They may also include uniforms worn for visual identification of personnel, for instance, those used by the military, the police, medical practitioners and guards among others.

 

For clothing to become uniform, the style and colour typically matches the corporate theme.  There are rules that govern the use of protective work clothing dependent upon the governing body of that industry. The manufacturer may also set or have input in these rules and standards. Clothing may only be deemed protective clothing when it is used appropriately and follows the strict standards attached to it.

 

Typically used in industry, research or manufacturing, protective work clothing has numerous standards which include their applicability to the various conditions that surround a specific working environment. These standards could include protection from chemicals, heat, and physical objects in a working environment. They provide the guidance for selection, use, care and maintenance. Also, there are specialised standards specifically for the various sectors or adverse environments such as agriculture, medical use or even violent situations.

 

There are various hazard categories that govern the manufacture and use of protective work clothing. These are listed as physical hazards, chemical hazards and biological hazards. Under the chemical hazards, we have corrosives, allergens, dermal and systemic toxins. The physical hazards an individual should wear protective clothing to prevent themselves from are radiation, vibration and hot or cold thermal hazards. Finally, the biological hazards include environmental, human and animal pathogens. The standards that specify the use and performance of protective work clothing may fall into numerous categories. These categories exist to ensure the use of all protective clothing is relevant not only to the environment but also in a way that protects those using such clothing from harm.

 

There are standards that specify the visibility characteristics of a protective garment these are:

·         protection against fluids and hazardous material

·          protection against thermal hazards when working around electronic equipment like electric arcs

·         protection against chemicals – this includes the requirements for the full body protection against any airborne solid particulates and protective clothing for application in welding and related processes

·          clothing against heat and flames among others.

 

Performance specifications describe the properties of the specific materials, be it original or composite as tested by laboratory methods. They must be of a high rating and performance; failure to abide by this will mean they are not suitable for the work environment. If protective clothing is not fit for purpose, it could result in injury, infection or exposure to elements and risks the clothing were originally intended to prevent.

Risk assessment can help you pinpoint areas of your business that may require protective clothing.  Risk planning mixed with health and safety can effectively save lives.  At TutorCare we offer a wide range of courses for industries that cover all aspects of health and safety.  Book now to take advantage of some of our latest offers for training onsite or online.

http://www.tutorcare.co.uk/health-and-safety-training-courses/risk-assessment

http://www.tutorcare.co.uk/health-and-safety-training-courses/health-and-safety-essentials

http://www.tutorcare.co.uk/e-learning/health-and-safety

http://www.tutorcare.co.uk/construction-courses

Five Tips For Time Management and Staying Focused

Distractions are a slippery slope and before you know it, hours or precious minutes have slipped by. Stay away from websites unless you have set aside time for browsing or while enjoying free time.

To help you stay focused, we’ve put together a list of five tips for your own personal time management.   Tips that can be used in your private life as well as your professional one.

 

Be Determined

Time management is like a diet, only a tad less painful. It can be just as beneficial and you will see the results sooner as you prepare yourself to be more determined. Along with staying focused, you have to be resolute to stick with your plan. There are exceptions to most every rule of course, and no one wants to stick to a plan that is not working, but being determined to stay on the path you have set will be a valuable asset.

 

Learn To Delegate

If you are running or managing a small business, there are a variety of things that can leach into your time. Micromanaging is a quick way to burn out, so find ways to delegate things. Perhaps it is trusting the postal service to take care of shipping, or setting up auto-withdrawal for your monthly expenses, you need to be able to stay on track and save time. Trust when there is the opportunity to do so.

 

Embrace Technology

Use email, Skype or phone calls instead of meetings. Sometimes meetings can just turn into meet and greets or friends catching up. You count in gas, lunch, and the time preparing, and meetings can pull valuable resources away from areas that need them. Meetings are necessary at times, so when planning an itinerary or schedule, make sure that 12:30 meeting with Betty Boop at the Bread Bakery is absolutely needed. Skype, instant messenger, and email are all valuable tools and sometimes can help you accomplish what you are looking to do in a much shorter period. This is very important when it comes to sales people as well.

 

Prepare in advance of meetings

If you know your work environment and are prepared, you will not need an hour-long presentation. Many times companies that cater to small businesses depend on the fact that small business owners are very busy and not as knowledgeable as they should be. If you are prepared with what you want and need, you can serve yourself better and save a great deal of time.

 

Do What You Need To Do

Procrastination may seem like a minor thing for people that have the skill and funds to start a small business in the first place, but it can get in everyone’s way. Knowing when to put something off and prioritizing is very important. When you are planning, put the things that need to be done at the top of the list and let those items command your attention. Sometimes things need to be put off because you do not have the time or assets to put towards them as well.

With these tips, you should be able to prepare and utilize your time better. Remember to prioritize, delegate when you can, stay focused and determined, and take advantage of the time you have.

If Time Management is something you or your employees struggle with visit our website and learn how to manage your time effectively.

The Difference Between Sprains, Strains and Breaks

In the workplace accidents, can happen at any time. Continuing our recent articles on health and safety this article covers some basic observations to help identify the differences between sprains, strains and breaks.

Any injury in the workplace can be costly If you cannot identify the problem, then getting the solution becomes even more daunting and hectic. Sprains, strains and breaks are all related and if you have experienced either of them, then you know what severe pain is. The three conditions are musculoskeletal disorders that normally affect the body’s musculoskeletal system or movement. In most cases, this disorder affects the tendons, nerves, ligaments, muscles, blood vessels among other body organs.

 

Musculoskeletal Injuries: The differences between Sprains, Strains and Breaks

Sprains

• A sprain happens as a tear or a stretch of a ligament which is the tissue connecting 2 bones. They support and stabilize the body’s joints enabling them to be flexible. A good example is the knee ligament connecting the two bones on the upper and lower side.

• Sprains happen following a fall, blow or twist on your body. They cause the affected joint to overstretch injuring or even rupturing the supporting ligaments.

• A mild sprain takes place when the ligament overstretch, but a severe sprain is where the ligament tears completely separating from the bone.

 

Strain

• A strain is a tear, twist or pull of a tendon and/or a muscle in the body. Tendons are defined as the cords of tissues that normally connect bones and muscles.

• Strains are caused by prolonged overuse of tendons and muscles without enough rest. Some of the signs of strains include; swelling, pain, inflammation, cramping muscle spasm and muscle weakness.

• Mild strains are rarely noticed, but severe ones can result to serious injuries following a complete rapture of the tendon and the muscles. Some of the common strains include back strain and hamstring muscle strain

 

Breaks

• Just like the name suggests, a break is a split, fracture or a complete break in the bone. Such injuries are caused by accidents, bone weakness or sports injuries.

• Unlike strains and sprains, breaks require immediate attention from a qualified doctor to ensure fast and proper healing.

 

In all cases if these injuries happen in the workplace you need to make sure it is noted in the company accident log and more importantly that the employee or visitor affected is taken to hospital where the injury causes pain.
TutorCare offer a wide range of training course that covers first aid in the workplace.  As well as identifying and offering advice on the above our courses discuss treatment for unconsciousness, shock, bleeding, burns and scalds.

 

The following is a list of currently available courses through TutorCare.