Seizures: what to do if your child has one

First of all don’t panic. Don’t assume seizures are a sign of epilepsy –  but do see your doctor immediately after the event.

Seizures can be fairly common in children, and have many causes. Don’t automatically assume the worst and panic if your child has one.

The immediate thought is that he or she may have epilepsy, or that your child has a greater risk of developing epilepsy in the future. Fortunately this is not true.

A seizure occurs when lots of brain cells abnormally fire at the same time. This temporarily disrupts the normal electrical signals to the brain. This excessive and intense electrical activity overwhelms the normal brain functions and results in abnormal behaviour, awareness and body movements. Continue reading “Seizures: what to do if your child has one”

Child Care – What to do if a baby is choking

Like adults, children and babies also are at risk from choking.

A choking baby is every parent’s biggest fear but it is also a serious risk to those that work in child care.  At TutorCare we offer courses covering a wide range of First Aid topics including Basic Paediatric First Aid Training that includes training on how to deal with a child choking.

Depending upon the childs age there are two different approaches to choking.
The following is a guide only outlining the steps a trained adult can take to stop a child or baby from choking.
Please do not follow these steps unless you have attended a certified course.

A video released by the NHS can be seen here

Continue reading “Child Care – What to do if a baby is choking”

Choking

A foreign object that is stuck at the back of the throat may block the throat or cause muscular spasm.

Young children especially are prone to choking. A child may choke on food, or may put small objects into their mouth and cause a blockage of the airway.

If the blockage of the area airway is mild, the casualty should be able to clear it; if it is severe they will be not be able to speak, cough or breathe and will eventually lose consciousness.

How to Recognise a:

Mild Obstruction:

  • Casualty will be able to breathe, speak, cry or cough
  • Severe obstruction

Severe Obstruction:

  • Casualty will be unable to breathe, speak, cry or cough
  • Casualty will eventually lose consciousness unless they are given assistance

Treatment for adult or child

Your aims are to remove the obstruction and to arrange urgent removal to hospital if necessary.

If the obstruction is mild:

  • Encourage them to continue coughing
  • Remove anything that is an obvious obstruction from the mouth

If the obstruction is severe:

Give up to 5 back blows

  • Look inside the mouth and remove anything causing an obvious obstruction

If the obstruction has not moved:

  • Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts
  • Look inside the mouth and remove anything causing an obvious obstruction

If the obstruction has not been cleared after repeating the cycle of back blows and abdominal thrusts three times

Call an ambulance by dialling 999 or 112

Keep repeating the pattern until help arrives

To see images and a video of actions that can be performed by a trained adult go here – What to do when a baby or infant chokes (For trained professionals)

SB (07/17)