Bullying Awareness – Too Sick for School, or Is Something Else Going On?

Children get sick with colds or other infections and viruses, as well as injuries. When they need to rest and recover, not to mention avoid passing on any germs to their classmates, it is right and proper to keep them at home. However, occasionally there are other factors at play, and for parents, carers and teachers it is important to spot bullying, and this is where anti-bullying awareness training is useful.

There are ways to check to see if they are ill. For example, something physical is clearly going on if they have obvious symptoms like vomiting, diarrhoea or a fever. Many parents have a rule of “no fun sick days.” If a child is home sick, they shouldn’t plan on television, video games, or computer time. The focus should be on resting and recovering, and maybe reading some books if not too ill. When kids don’t care about these limits and don’t argue with them, chances are they are actually feeling poorly.

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My child has autism, now what?

My child has autism, now what do I do?  The phrase has been asked countless times after diagnosis and quite regularly is a shock.

Autism is a frightening diagnosis that leaves many parents in a state of devastation. It’s a complex disorder that has no known cause and presents itself in each child differently. It’s a word that sends worried new parents researching everything from the safety of vaccinations to optimal gut health.

With the rates of diagnosis increasing exponentially over the last several years, it makes sense that autism would become a huge topic of conversation both in the medical world and in the conversations between new parents.

So what do you do if one of your tightly held fears of receiving a diagnosis for your child comes to pass? How do you keep it together when all you want to do is fall apart? This article offers a realistic outlook on what to do after receiving an autism diagnosis. Continue reading “My child has autism, now what?”

Baby first aid – emergency care for your babies health

Basic First Aid (Baby first aid) for Parents of Babies

As parents of a baby, the last thing you want to consider is your baby being in a critical condition. However, knowing basic first aid (baby first aid) techniques could make a crucial difference for your baby if an emergency situation does arise.

Surveys, carried out in 2015 by St John Ambulance, Findababysitter.com, The national “Save a Life Survey” and Mother & Baby Magazine, have revealed some shocking results.

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Seizures: what to do if your child has one

First of all don’t panic. Don’t assume seizures are a sign of epilepsy –  but do see your doctor immediately after the event.

Seizures can be fairly common in children, and have many causes. Don’t automatically assume the worst and panic if your child has one.

The immediate thought is that he or she may have epilepsy, or that your child has a greater risk of developing epilepsy in the future. Fortunately this is not true.

A seizure occurs when lots of brain cells abnormally fire at the same time. This temporarily disrupts the normal electrical signals to the brain. This excessive and intense electrical activity overwhelms the normal brain functions and results in abnormal behaviour, awareness and body movements. Continue reading “Seizures: what to do if your child has one”

Child Care – What to do if a baby is choking

Like adults, children and babies also are at risk from choking.

A choking baby is every parent’s biggest fear but it is also a serious risk to those that work in child care.  At TutorCare we offer courses covering a wide range of First Aid topics including Basic Paediatric First Aid Training that includes training on how to deal with a child choking.

Depending upon the childs age there are two different approaches to choking.
The following is a guide only outlining the steps a trained adult can take to stop a child or baby from choking.
Please do not follow these steps unless you have attended a certified course.

A video released by the NHS can be seen here

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A foreign object that is stuck at the back of the throat may block the throat or cause muscular spasm.

Young children especially are prone to choking. A child may choke on food, or may put small objects into their mouth and cause a blockage of the airway.

If the blockage of the area airway is mild, the casualty should be able to clear it; if it is severe they will be not be able to speak, cough or breathe and will eventually lose consciousness.

How to Recognise a:

Mild Obstruction:

  • Casualty will be able to breathe, speak, cry or cough
  • Severe obstruction

Severe Obstruction:

  • Casualty will be unable to breathe, speak, cry or cough
  • Casualty will eventually lose consciousness unless they are given assistance

Treatment for adult or child

Your aims are to remove the obstruction and to arrange urgent removal to hospital if necessary.

If the obstruction is mild:

  • Encourage them to continue coughing
  • Remove anything that is an obvious obstruction from the mouth

If the obstruction is severe:

Give up to 5 back blows

  • Look inside the mouth and remove anything causing an obvious obstruction

If the obstruction has not moved:

  • Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts
  • Look inside the mouth and remove anything causing an obvious obstruction

If the obstruction has not been cleared after repeating the cycle of back blows and abdominal thrusts three times

Call an ambulance by dialling 999 or 112

Keep repeating the pattern until help arrives

To see images and a video of actions that can be performed by a trained adult go here – What to do when a baby or infant chokes (For trained professionals)

SB (07/17)