Mental health illness – how common is it?

According to statistics from NHS Digital, at any one time, a sixth of the population in England aged 16 to 64 have a mental health illness.  Whether family, friends, neighbours or work colleagues, the chances are we all know someone that is affected.

The figures, while worrying, in reality don’t even scratch the surface.  The study, which leaves out less common conditions – and is a snapshot in time, could be closer to a quarter of the population experiencing mental health illness on an annual basis.

Statistically, women are more likely than men to experience mental and emotional (not psychotic) illness. Research shows that 20 per cent of all adult women between the ages of 16 to 65 have ‘significant mental health problems’, as compared with 14 per cent of men between these ages.
However, women are more likely to seek, and be diagnosed, help for mental health problems.

Young people are particularly susceptible to mental health difficulties.

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Identify a Stroke – How to identify strokes for carers and family members

Strokes can be life-threatening, and today they are unfortunately common (there are around 32,000 stroke related deaths in the UK every year). As such, it is important to understand what strokes are, and how to properly identify a stroke as they happen. Continue reading “Identify a Stroke – How to identify strokes for carers and family members”

Challenging behaviour – how to deal with it

In a care environment, challenging behaviour can be difficult to deal with. Learning how to deal with challenging behaviour effectively and empathically is vital to providing the best care for patients, and for maintaining a positive mentality.  This article explains challenging behaviour- in what forms it appears and its possible triggers- and gives advice on how to handle it when it arises.
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Mandatory Training Courses – What are they?

Mandatory training relates to training that employers are expected to provide to their staff following statutory requirements.  Statutory requirements include the Health and Safety at Work Act, local authority requirements, and the requirements specified by the Care Quality Commission. Continue reading “Mandatory Training Courses – What are they?”

Are Mandatory Training Courses different to Statutory Training Courses? (CQC)

Statutory training relates to training this is required legally in order to protect individuals in the workplace.  Mandatory training relates to trade specific training that the employer considers essential or compulsory for a specific job.  Both phrases are often confused by employers.  This article covers a list of mandatory social care training courses and looks at those that are statutory within the confines of the CQC.

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Autism: Sensory Seekers and Sensory Avoiders

There are many misunderstood aspects of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but one of the most frequent but incorrect assumptions is that all people with ASD are sensory avoiders. While it is true that many people with ASD are over-sensitive to sensations, this is not true of all people with ASD. Once you understand this, you’ll have a better understanding of people with ASD.

Autism: ASD

When discussing sensations about ASD, the sensations are typically grouped into the categories of movement, touch, sight, sound, and smell. When a person is diagnosed with ASD, he or she should also be assessed to determine his or her sensitivity to sensations in each of these categories. A person with ASD may be over-sensitive or under-sensitive to all categories of sensations, but it is much more common to find a person is over-sensitive to some categories of sensations and under-sensitive to others.

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Specialist care training – what is it?

As a carer working in the health care sector, it is crucial that every patient is afforded the correct support and care. Specialist care training courses can provide the skills and knowledge necessary to complete a range of specialist tasks, including the management of instances relating to conflict or challenging behaviour. Continue reading “Specialist care training – what is it?”

Health and Social Care Professionals – why become one?

As the population ages rapidly, more and more people will rely on health and social care professionals. The care home sector is huge in the UK but improvements in health and social care services, along with advances in technology now mean that the elderly are able to stay in their own homes longer.

In 2016 a study by skillsforcare.org revealed that 1.55 million people in the Uk work in the field.  With an average age of 43, it is an industry that attracts health and social professionals both young and old.  The role of domiciliary carers has increased dramatically over the past decade but the vast range of careers in this sector brings people of all types to work.  Roles as diverses as individual support for those with disabilities or learning difficulties to care homes managers and child care assistants. Continue reading “Health and Social Care Professionals – why become one?”

Role of Health and Social Care Workers

Social care is a term used for help that is provided in terms of physical and emotional support. The main aim is to help people live their lives in a happy and healthy manner despite their disabilities; either physical or emotional. This article discusses the Role of Health and Social care workers in the community and explains some of the courses you can take to become qualified. Continue reading “Role of Health and Social Care Workers”

Entry to social care: the Common Induction Standards

If you are new to the health and social care sector, there are a number of areas you must be trained in before you can work unsupervised. These are known as the Common Induction Standards, and they are essential for anyone starting a career in social care.

The Common Induction Standards are designed to reflect current policy and practice within the sector, and give new staff a comprehensive and standardised induction into their new roles. They feed in perfectly to more advanced training courses such as the QCF NVQ Diploma in Health and Social Care (Level 2), offering a more consistent approach to induction and training across the whole of the sector.

So, what are the Common Induction Standards?

There are eight standards, each representing an area of knowledge that you must be well-versed in before you can really get your career started.

1 Role of the health and social care worker
2 Personal development
3 Communicate effectively
4 Equality and Inclusion
5 Principles for implementing duty of care
6 Principles of safeguarding in health and social care
7 Person-centred support
8 Health and safety in an adult social care setting

If you study these eight areas in depth, you will have taken the first important step to delivering high-quality care and support.