What is Schizophrenia?

Public awareness of mental illnesses is on the rise, and for good reason. Approximately 1 in 6 people in the UK will need treatment for mental health conditions in their lifetimes, for a wide variety of mental health conditions. In particular, approximately 1 in 100 people will suffer from an episode of schizophrenia at some point in there life.

At any one moment, some 220,000 people in the Uk alone are receiving treatment for the condition. This article endeavours to explain the symptoms and hypothesised causes of schizophrenia.

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What is Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple sclerosis, more commonly known as MS, is a disease suffered by around 100,000 people in the UK, with 5000 new diagnoses each year.

That equates to 1 in every 600 people in the UK suffering from the disease.

It ranges from mild cases to being totally debilitating and disabling. This article outlines the symptoms, treatment, and causes of MS, as well as offering some advice on how to live with the condition.

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What is Reablement?

Reablement is an intensive short service, usually delivered in the home (or care home), which is offered to those recovering from an illness or injury. Whether it be after surgery or a bout of serious illness, modern medicine is often able to cure their afflictions.

However, for many people, the process of healing doesn’t end at discharge from the hospital. Aftercare of various lengths is typically required for many patients, with varying degrees of intensity.

This article will explain the process of reablement, and what things might take place during the course of aftercare treatment.

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Treating Depression

Depression is a serious mental health condition that affects many thousands of people globally. In the UK alone 3% of people suffer from some form of clinical depression, with numbers rising as high as 20% for more general thoughts of suicidality. As such, understanding proper treatment options for depression is an important element of patient care. This article highlights the primary paths available when treating depression.

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Mental health illness – how common is it?

According to statistics from NHS Digital, at any one time, a sixth of the population in England aged 16 to 64 have a mental health illness.  Whether family, friends, neighbours or work colleagues, the chances are we all know someone that is affected.

The figures, while worrying, in reality don’t even scratch the surface.  The study, which leaves out less common conditions – and is a snapshot in time, could be closer to a quarter of the population experiencing mental health illness on an annual basis.

Statistically, women are more likely than men to experience mental and emotional (not psychotic) illness. Research shows that 20 per cent of all adult women between the ages of 16 to 65 have ‘significant mental health problems’, as compared with 14 per cent of men between these ages.
However, women are more likely to seek, and be diagnosed, help for mental health problems.

Young people are particularly susceptible to mental health difficulties.

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Identify a Stroke – How to identify strokes for carers and family members

Strokes can be life-threatening, and today they are unfortunately common (there are around 32,000 stroke related deaths in the UK every year). As such, it is important to understand what strokes are, and how to properly identify a stroke as they happen. Continue reading “Identify a Stroke – How to identify strokes for carers and family members”

Challenging behaviour – how to deal with it

In a care environment, challenging behaviour can be difficult to deal with. Learning how to deal with challenging behaviour effectively and empathically is vital to providing the best care for patients, and for maintaining a positive mentality.  This article explains challenging behaviour- in what forms it appears and its possible triggers- and gives advice on how to handle it when it arises.
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Mandatory Training Courses – What are they?

Mandatory training relates to training that employers are expected to provide to their staff following statutory requirements.  Statutory requirements include the Health and Safety at Work Act, local authority requirements, and the requirements specified by the Care Quality Commission. Continue reading “Mandatory Training Courses – What are they?”

Are Mandatory Training Courses different to Statutory Training Courses? (CQC)

Statutory training relates to training this is required legally in order to protect individuals in the workplace.  Mandatory training relates to trade specific training that the employer considers essential or compulsory for a specific job.  Both phrases are often confused by employers.  This article covers a list of mandatory social care training courses and looks at those that are statutory within the confines of the CQC.

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Autism: Sensory Seekers and Sensory Avoiders

There are many misunderstood aspects of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but one of the most frequent but incorrect assumptions is that all people with ASD are sensory avoiders. While it is true that many people with ASD are over-sensitive to sensations, this is not true of all people with ASD. Once you understand this, you’ll have a better understanding of people with ASD.

Autism: ASD

When discussing sensations about ASD, the sensations are typically grouped into the categories of movement, touch, sight, sound, and smell. When a person is diagnosed with ASD, he or she should also be assessed to determine his or her sensitivity to sensations in each of these categories. A person with ASD may be over-sensitive or under-sensitive to all categories of sensations, but it is much more common to find a person is over-sensitive to some categories of sensations and under-sensitive to others.

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