Registered care home managers: what qualifications you will need

If you have the ambition to become a manager or supervisors in a care home, you will need certain skills, qualities and qualifications. This is the case in any position of responsibility, especially in the care sector where the welfare of other people is at stake.

Disposition

To progress in a managerial role in the care sector, you will need to be a certain kind of person. You will need to have integrity, be responsible, organised and honest, and be able to manage people. Most importantly, you need to be passionate about protecting and respecting the people in your care.

Qualifications

Depending on the position you are applying for, you will need either one or both of the following care training qualifications:

NVQ Level 4 Health and Social Care This kind of course covers most managerial duties, including communication and reporting, professional development (of self and staff), the protection of all individuals and healthy and safe working practices.

Leadership and Management of Care Services (LMC) This care training course goes into more depth on the subject of how to efficiently run a care service. It covers everything from how to develop procedures, policies and practices to communication, leadership skills and respecting the rights of patients.

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Analysing your Training Needs

Successful businesses survive by adapting.  As customer requirements shift, the successful organisation has already laid the framework to facilitate change. Products may age but a keen eye ensures the company product range evolves. Smart organisations stay ahead of the market by responsible analysis of all company endeavours from common practises such as SWOT analysis to internal programmes such as continuously evaluating training needs.

The training needs of your organisation has two defining features:

1) It can be overcome or reduced through learning and / or development

2) It is any shortcoming, gap, or problem that prevents an individual or an organisation from achieving its objectives

At the organisational level the training need is relative to anything that hinders the achievement of strategic objectives, be it lack of skill or aggressive corporate behaviour; for example, a lack of customer care skills that harms the business or a lack of interpersonal skills that negatively affects staff retention.

For individuals the training need occurs when the said individual requires knowledge, lacks a particular skillset or fails to be successful due to an inability to adapt their behaviour to meet the requirements of a given situation.  Employers sometimes make erroneous assumptions about their employees so the key to training needs analysis (TNA) is to communicate effectively and evaluate all shortcomings within the organisation from a training perspective.  TNA helps you address this in a “big picture” approach by systematically breaking down the culture within your organisation and using internal mechanisms such as staff appraisals to identify and harness change.

What are the Advantages?

Training needs analysis offers the following advantages:

> The targeting of  resources at identified priorities

> By helping individuals and teams perform better individually and as a whole.  This results in improved job satisfaction, morale and overall motivation

> Provides an ongoing structure for improving performance

> Enhances the organisation’s progress towards training programmes such as Investors in People

> Flows naturally from the appraisal process, in which staff discussions  help tailor training towards their needs

Effective training or development depends on knowing what results are required and tailoring it to match corporate objectives.  With limited budgets and the need for cost effective solutions, all organisations need to feel secure that the resources invested in training are targeted at areas in which training and development is needed.  Only then can a positive return on the investment be guaranteed.

Considerations

> Identify courses that are relevant to your organisation.  Not just those that are mandatory to the sector you operate in but also those that allow you to diversify when the need arises

> Identify training that has not been arranged in the past and look at why that is the case.  Working outside of the box has its advantages and training should offer as much to the organisation as it does to the individual

> Review previous training sessions and verify that expected outcomes were met.  If not find out why.  If existing methods are outdated, replace them or invest in newer methods that increase productivity

At TutorCare we are a training provider that constantly evolves.  Our training needs analysis goes beyond our corporate responsibility and is embedded into our ethos.  We continuously re-evaluate our product range so that you, as a client or potential client have access to all necessary information at a time and pace that suits the needs of your employees and the overall business.

From supervision and appraisal training to time management and team leadership, if your TNA requires outsourced training, we are here to help.  With E-Learning plans and onsite group work we have a suitable solution that offers true return on any investment in training.

Training to become an activities coordinator in a care environment

Care workers with responsibility for a number of service users have generally undergone extensive training in areas such as medication dispensation, infection control and nutrition awareness. These and many other areas are all vital to keep residents or patients safe and healthy. However, just as important to quality of life for people in care environments is regular, stimulating activity.

Activities coordinators in care environments are often just as important as care workers and nurses, as they ensure that the people under their care develop and retain the skills they need to experience excellent quality of life.

By undergoing an activities coordinator training course, you will learn about:

• The role of the activities coordinator and its importance
• Ways in which service users and their families can help to plan and provide activities
• The importance of assessing the needs and abilities of service users before planning activities
• The different activities that can be planned for varying groups of service users

Our current course can be found here – Developing the Role of Activities Coordinator

This kind of care training course is not only intended for those who aim to take on an activities coordinator role; it can be useful for all staff working in care environments.

TutorCare offer a wide range of training courses specifically for the Care Sector.

Our Care Train the Trainer Course helps staff to deliver their own CQC courses and reduce future training overheads.

For more articles, more relevant to todays training please take some time to look at the following;

How to tell if someone is suffering from Dementia

Why do care workers need such good observational skills

The Role of Health and Social Care Workers

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Why do care workers need such good observation skills?

A person who works within the health and social care sector will need to have a wide range of skills and knowledge in a number of areas. However, one of the most important skills you will ever learn in your career as a care worker is observation.

With good observation skills, you will able to provide a better service for the people under your care. You can even use your observation skills to make the care environment safer overall.

Good observation skills are essential for a number of reasons, including:

– Identifying patterns of behaviour in care service users which may need attention
– Identifying problems quickly, so that they can be addressed before they worse
– Spotting abuse or negligence
– Noticing any areas of care which could be improved

How to improve your observation skills

Improving your observation skills isn’t always easy, but it can help to go on an Observation Skills for Carers training course. Here you will learn everything from the importance of observations and how to analyse behaviour to accurate record keeping. This last skill is just as important as observation.

For more information see – Care Planning | Safe Guarding Children

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Managing Conflict in the Work Place

There are many areas in the workplace where conflict can arise and the reasons for these may not be straightforward.  However the main issues tend to revolve around perceived unfair treatment or a lack of awareness regarding internal structure.  Issues that can cause conflict include;

  • Unfair treatment of an employee
  • Poor man management (or management on the whole)
  • Unclear job specifications / role
  • Inadequate training
  • Poor working conditions or work environment
  • Lack of equal opportunities
  • Bullying and harassment
  • Poor communication

As in life there are typically four responses to any kind of conflict.  These are;

Fight – a reaction in a challenging or aggressive manner.  This could include loss of temper and control or raised voices leading to shouting; Often bringing irrational responses that sometimes aren’t typical of the individual.

Flight – ignoring the problem in the hope it goes away.  Effectively turning a blind eye to what is actually going on.

Passive – withdrawing from the issue at hand.  An employee may become passive after attempting to deal with the problem but feeling the conflict isn’t going to be resolved due to indecision or lack of support.

Facing the problem – a planned approach to deal with the issue in a calm and rational way.

 

Symptoms of conflict

Where it is difficult to spot symptoms of conflict, training in any kind of Conflict Management can help.  TutorCare offer a range of such courses that include Conflict Management that helps with not only the identification of challenging behaviour but also deals with causes and effects in the workplace.  More importantly if you complete our “CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR AWARENESS” course you will be able to work towards a calm response to any work related conflict.

With any training you’ll be able to identify symptoms of conflict that include:

Sickness and absence increase:  depression and stress

Productivity decrease: a lack of cohesion creates a decrease in productivity and a general increase in queries and complains where employees fail to co-operate

Behavioural changes: members of staff making derogatory remarks or arranging fewer social events together

Motivational decrease: fewer employees volunteer to take on board new tasks or offer little input at meetings or briefings

By identifying the underlying symptoms you can then work on how to manage conflict.  For individuals this may be as simple as having a quiet word or investigating the problem informally. It may mean utilising internal procedures but more importantly it will mean listening.  Wider issues can be solved by improving the way management communicates and consults with employees.  It can include forming internal working groups to tackle problems as a team or using problem solving techniques to find joint solutions in the workplace.

It may even mean getting outside help.

The key to all of this is not only developing an acute awareness to the working environment but being prepared to listen and adapt accordingly.

TutorCare offers a wide range of training packages that deal with conflict or aggressive behaviour in the workplace.  From office disagreements to handling abusive behaviour in care homes we have a solution that can be uniquely tailored to your needs.

First aid in the workplace – the importance of record keeping

One of the most important parts of first aid in the workplace is record keeping. In fact, it can be just as crucial as sending staff members on a first aid training course or ensuring that first aid kits are fully stocked.

This is because proper record keeping allows a business or organisation to manage health and safety risks in the future. Using the information noted down in a workplace incident book, business owners can monitor how medical emergencies are dealt with and what improvements are needed, such as giving more staff members first aid training.

An incident book can also help when conducting health and safety risk assessments, giving vital information that can help businesses to identify trends and remove or reduce hazards which may lead to medical emergencies.

To ensure you are adhering to good practice with regards to first aid record keeping, ensure your business has an incident book for illness and injury. Each entry into this book should include:

• The name and position of the ill or injured person
• The name and signature of the person dealing with the incident (i.e. the designated first aider)
• The date, time and place the incident occurred
• What happened during the incident, whether first aid was given and what happened afterwards (i.e. the person went to hospital).

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